David Gumbs is native from the beautiful island of Saint-Martin in the French West Indies. As a Multimedia artist, painter, photographer, and experimental video artist, his work challenges the « Perception’s Offscreen », the unseen, the cycle of life, the nature within, and digital rhizome macroscopic universes. His research investigates the spectator’s perception and mental landscape.
 Discovering the Martinican and Cuban flora triggered a vivid passion for mythical forest Gods in island cultures. This was the beginning of an identity quest through the exploration of topics dealing with the offscreen of perception, the cycle of life, the visible and invisible, and rhizome graphical macroscopic universes. His polymorphic art reveals the interbreeding and hybridization process in the collective and individual unconsciousness in Caribbean imagination.


David Gumbs’s artistic approach is based on a famous quotation from XVII th century French philosopher and chemist Antoine Lavoisier : « Mass is neither gained nor lost, merely transformed ». Thus, life’s cycle, infinite scale, memory, and the Sacred, are themes that emerge from larger topics of interest such as inner/outer landscape, and offscreen.
 These immersed spaces reveal personal inner projections from the unconscious, thus emerging his « Mental Archeology » through others. His research indeed focuses on the different feelings, emotions, and stimulations that build memory.

His latest work, Unconcious Geographies is an interactive installation that invites you to participate in Gumb’s inner journey and his organic world.

I’ve created an immersive and interactive show that questions the viewers perception, memories and self awareness by their movements, hand gestures, and by blowing into a conch shell. The general idea was to investigate what I call both the spectator’s and myself’s “Mental Archeology”. Using their reacts, questions, feedbacks and comments as food to discover more about who I am.

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Indepth Look at David Gumb’s Work